End Of An Era

Recently my uncle who passed away after suffering with cancer and severe lung problems was farewelled in a poignant memorial service. Held in the place where he had worshipped for over twenty years, the service was remarkable in many ways. Firstly the two clergy presiding were senior clerics of the Newcastle Diocese, a Bishop and a Dean. Secondly they were female.

It seemed fitting somehow that this was so, especially as two of his three children are strong, independent, professional females. The other is a sensitive kind man who was brought up ahead of his time to be a SNAG by his mother, my late and much loved Auntie Shirley. My cousin Stephen gave a truly wonderful eulogy, which had humour and truth mixed in with so much love and pride the tears flowed down my face. No sound, just tears of empathy for my cousin Jayne and her husband who had helped my uncle live at home by being live in carers for the past two years. For my cousin Louise who had been there for her mother who suffered so with cancer over twenty years ago.

I also felt a deep sense of kinship, of family bonding which had been nourished so much when we were younger by our parents. There were times when I had such vivid flashbacks of memory as Stephen recounted how the family had first joined us here as migrants in the sixties. I remember sleeping in our small fibro cabin while they were out the back yard in an even smaller fibro one.

I remember the debates about which TV channels to watch. We watched Channel 9 and 7 while Uncle Eddie insisted on ABC. Thank God for the little bit of intelligent viewing we had for the weeks they were with us! I remembered how glamorous I found Auntie Shirley, how I could not wait to show her my Heidi and Little Women books.

The girls had long hair and it was Uncle Eddie’s task to brush the knots out of their hair. Jayne particularly used to let out blood curdling squeals of protest but Uncle Eddie was no pushover. He tamed their often seawater and salt laden hair and the time doing this created a wonderful father daughter bonding.

We had been here for some years by the time the Elsom’s arrived and while my sister and I had quickly integrated into school and made firm friends my mum had been increasingly isolated by my father who did not like neighbours inviting her regularly to dinner and afternoon tea. Dad worked all hours and though he took us fishing at night in summer after he finished work our next door neighbours became our family. Mr Cadogan had become a proxy dad to us, teaching us to swim and snorkel at The Rock Pool, later on having the most delicious sausages he had barbecued in soft fluffy white rolls. We prawned with nets at Canton Beach, cooking the prawns in boiling salted water in pots over fire pits right there on the sand.

I can only imagine the sheer wonder of this outdoor life for my cousins. Once they were settled in a gorgeous old house with a huge covered verandah in Lorn in Maitland we had regular get togethers whereby Uncle Eddie drove the family down to our house. We either ate the food both families provided at home or if the weather was not too hot we loaded up our car with food and went to The Rock Pool or The Lighthouse or Soldier’s Beach, wherever there were picnic tables.

Oh the food! Food was love in my mum’s mind and she adored her nieces and nephew and my little brother who was born not long after The Elsom’s arrived here. Auntie Shirley was just brilliant at anything she touched. So we usually had a huge cold home made steak, potato and vegetable pie from her and a big homemade Pork Pie from mum. Plus all sorts of side dishes including Aunty Shirley’s famous coleslaw and her incomparable slices for afternoon tea. It was like the feasting of The Famous Five or The Secret Seven during their long summer hols, but this was twice a month!  As soon as the clothes for Sunday church were removed and casual things thrown on the Elsom’s were on their way. And I was SO impatient!

We also visited them regularly on Sundays at Lorn where we would go for walks on the most amazing things. Paths! We eventually meandered across the bridge and down the High Street. This was town life to us and always thrilled me. Even if my sister was a right witch in the back of the car and we both got into HUGE trouble with a very angry dad we still both wanted to visit our only family.

So now that Eddie is gone I feel there is an ending of an era. We cousins are now the older generation, the keeper of these memories. It is why I am determined to get them down now. I am not very mobile but do my best work sitting down so am capturing as much as I can here and in my other blog kissmekate. Eventually I want to join the two blogs together into a memoir and then I can put the whole story together, because as events happen in my life I remember more of the past. So much was hidden before due to emotional trauma in childhood and as a teenager.

Eddie and family, along with The Cadogans made my life normal. Because in seeing them as such happy family units I knew how it could be. How it should be. I will never ever forget what Shirley and Eddie meant to me, including the adult me. They accepted me. They loved me. They showed Christ’s love to me and they were the first people I told when I found faith in my twenties. Uncle Eddie looked out for mum until I got up here to look after her. We chatted on the phone regularly and he was a great support to me when I was live in caregiver to an extremely violent father. When he became very ill I offered to take him regularly to his specialists but he said confidently and kindly that Louise would take him. His children and grandchildren came together to make his end of life quiet and peaceful. Qualities learned at Eddie’s knee.

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

A Soft Touch

 

In mid 2013 I started knitting mum a blanket to go with the colours of her room in the carehome and to remind her of the sea. I started by knitting rectangles on 6.5mm needles with two strands of 8ply yarn. The yarn was all found in various hidden stashes in her home. Some bags of yarn date from over ten years before and were unopened.

You see Alzheimer’s slowly took all mum’s hobbies from her. She forgot how to knit. To sew. To garden. To write. She could still read simple short lists but marvelled at the writing on our calendars. Said it would be wonderful to be able to do that. 

In the mornings I used to take a cup of coffee out with a muesli bar onto one of the two balconies running the length of their house. There I would knit the rectangles undisturbed until dad got back from his morning constitutional. I was working on two blankets then. 

The next year my mum suddenly passed away and I had not been able to touch this until recently. However mum is free, her spirit released, her body freed of pain and her mind also.  So I am adapting these rectangles into a blanket mixing many shades together. I added Patons Inca to the mix which has wool and alpaca for warmth and provides a soft touch. It is being knitted on 10mm needles and as it adds up to 30ply I am knitting it in strips. So far in a few days I have almost completed the first strip.

I am so happy to be knitting again  My hands are not what they were as the joints have a lot of arthritis and there is Neuropathy too but knitting has been my passion since mum and I pulled down a jumper of hers and I knitted my first item, a jumper with lace cables and bobbles. I was fifteen. The bobbles were inside the lace pattern  Very complex. These days I am more into colour and texture than patterns. I am enjoying this blanket’s journey, who knows where it will end up?

 

Greeted With Open Arms

A year ago today I was out very early in the morning in the garden deadheading my many buddleja, flowering Andean sage, nasturtium and hibiscus. It is the best time to do it as at other times the plants are always covered in fat bees and butterflies. I did not want to get stung and I have an ongoing conversation with the bees that they do not own the plants, I do!

By 10.30 I had showered and dressed carefully for my day ahead. The day was going to be a full one, firstly the dentist for an extraction of a very painful molar and later on in the afternoon a visit from a special friend. I easily caught the bus up to the dentist, had a lovely chat with the receptionist and was even able to give some requested advice to one of them about not having her scheduled surgery using gynaecological mesh. The dentist assistant was a lovely silver haired girl in her teens and the dentist was a fabulous female. Very gentle.

The extraction was difficult, involving curved roots that were immediately near the sinus cavity. I was warned if it perforated it would need surgical repair. However all was well and we all smiled with relief when it was over. I did have to be careful not to sneeze with my mouth shut for a few days though! As I bit down on some gauze I tentatively made my way over to the shopping centre to get some goodies for afternoon tea.

Then I walked home, not bad considering my Cervical Spinal Stenosis makes pressure on my neck …..difficult. Perhaps the dentist asking that the nurse hold my head made a difference. Once home I had a very milky cup of tea, an interesting taste through blood soaked gauze!

When I checked my messages my friend said his daughter was through sooner than he thought so they would be over early afternoon instead of late. I rang him and asked what time and he said they were in Belmont! And asked for directions! I replied I had no idea as I do not drive and isn’t that what Google Maps are for? In the background I could hear this delightful giggling coming from his daughter G and much chatter and fun going on between them.

So after I hung up I dashed to the bathroom and spat out the second gauze plug…no further bleeding so was very pleased. I whacked on some bright red lipstick and fluffed up my hair and made sure the bathroom was ready for guests. Luckily I always over prepare so the snacks were plated up. Fresh plump blueberries, Maltezers and some sort of biscuits, perhaps Tim Tams? And lots of Irish tea.

Almost as soon as I had poured milk into the jug of my lovely Maxwell and Williams afternoon tea setting I heard laughter, giggles and chatter. I made my way to the door, suddenly overcome with nerves. I need not have worried, I was greeted with open arms by J and introduced to his daughter, whom I hugged with less reserve. J chatting all the way inside and gladly accepting the offer of a cuppa.

This was a very special meeting, one delayed by many many years, almost a lifetime in fact. We had met by phone only when he helped me with my dad in 2014, which was the year mum passed away. Early the next year he retired and his kindness and his lovely voice was quite a loss to me, so after six months I contacted him and we became Facebook friends. This led to playing Words With Friends, maniacally at times, depending upon who had a free afternoon midweek. Matches often went on all afternoon. I liked to online chat as we played. He preferred to play then chat.

We lost touch late 2015 until late last year, it coincided with my getting off my walker and having correct diagnoses for several issues which had made me less mobile than I should be. I was full of joy at being in charge of my health again and looking forward to the possibilities life might have in store for me rather than a life limited by disability. It had made me rather reckless in my online communication with J and I felt quite overcome with embarrassment at some of the things I had got up to online.

I put my best Verger front on though and we had a lovely time, with me teasing him about his many accents. He speaks in many UK dialects! Chatting with G was wonderful, about fashion, her new job and her move down here recently to be near her family. I loved her freshness and innocence. We all three trooped out to see my infamous  buddlejas and the rest of the garden.

After a fun time involving me begging J not to make me laugh because of my extraction, accompanied by peels of laughter from G, it was sadly time for them to go. J hugged me goodbye, a protracted hug which I was mortified by as I did not have a bra on! G then answered a phone call and J came out of the car for more cuddles and said we would be talking online. To which I answered of course.

So I survived the first meeting, met my man of many voices, his gorgeous daughter, and survived my embarrassment. How good it is to be over 60. To have nothing to lose. To trust someone so deeply that anything is possible. Indeed to even meet someone where anything is possible is a rare thing. Over time since then we have committed ourselves to each other, in words and deeds. And to each other’s adult children and we love being involved in their lives.

 

 

Delightfully Relaxed and Friendly

A few months ago my partner J drove me to Newcastle Airport so that I could fly to Brisbane to visit my high school friend, It was my first holiday in many years having not flown since 1991. I also found the experience very different to my time as an Ansett hostess in 1975/1976.

The Virgin crew were very good on the ground at Newcastle Airport. They assisted me via hydraulic lift to enter the airplane and the same on debarkation. While waiting for the lift at Brisbane I disclosed I had not been back to Brisbane since I lived and worked out of there as an Air Hostess for Ansett in 1975. The team leader promptly told the Captain and they all escorted me off the plane, chatting about the changes as I was wheeled to where my friend was waiting. The team leader was keen to meet up sometime to talk but I did not have my wits about me. I need to get some cards printed up so that people can contact me as it will make it easier, especially when advocating for people.

My friend was waiting for me, it was so lovely to see her again. It was a lovely drive to her home and so precious to spend time with her. She was on half yearly break and also needing the holiday. I met her wonderful daughter and we three went to The Bee Gees Walk which was amazing. I felt terrible for them though as my legs are so weak now I could not walk very far and had to sit a lot. However in the car I was fine and it was a wonderful trip there. We passed Indooroopilly Shopping Centre, a huge complex which we also visited on my last full day there. We also passed Ikea. Now I know where my Brisbane based friends are when they say they are shopping at Ikea.

Another day we drove to Morton Bay Shire and I adored the country town about an hour inland where L took me which had fabulous antique shops and galleries etc. I bought fudge from an antiques shop, after a long lunch with her and her friend. L bought some charming Wedgewood dessert plates from there. We then went back to her friend’s rural property where I met her family. It was lovely to see the family’s alternate lifestyle and be with fellow upcyclers etc.

L has committed to buying nothing new for a year and in that vein we went to many many fabulous charity shops. Amazing clothing in all the top designers was found and I hoped I could manage to get everything into my suitcase when I left!

I had one disaster with my colostomy. I had shockingly rapid output one day and I just managed to get to the toilet in a small shopping centre. The disabled toilet was huge however it had no surfaces for me to lay out my supplies and wet wipes etc, so disaster struck. It took me ages to clean up the toilet and floor etc and my poor friend was patiently waiting outside for me. After checking my clothing I considered myself lucky it did not go on there and then we launched ourselves into food shopping upstairs in the centre. Me holding up a quite a queue of able bodied climbers! However I found everyone I met there delightfully relaxed and friendly.

Straight after we had an appointment for tea at a friend’s Persian restaurant. On the way in the car I kept smelling poo. I checked my hands. Peeked into my leggings. Nothing. I scrubbed my hands with sanitiser but it was still there. After saying that it must be all in my head my friend started to smell it too! We were at a loss. I sprayed lots of my Frangipani perfume to cover it up and we went into the restaurant.

L introduced me to her lovely friend and we tried to decide what to have to eat. Eventually we had coffee and tea and decided on taking food home for dinner. We grabbed our bags, car keys and sunglasses and made our way to the car. I clambered into her car and buckled my seatbelt and when I went to put on my sunglasses I smelled poo. Yes….there was a blob of poo on my blackish brownish sunglasses. After screeching with horror then laughter I attacked them with my disinfectant wipes and we tried not to think of the sunglasses on the restaurant table for all that time.

When we returned to L’s house I texted my son, asking him if he could guess what had happened. I texted in short sentences building the drama. Of course he upped the ante by answering in funny memes of horror! It was storytelling at its finest. I sent that all on to my partner, though he loves words he also loves the way C and I are so alike and so bonded, even in our humour.

We had many wonderful meals at L’s home. A fabulous curry courtesy of her fabulous daughter E one night and L’s homemade soup another. The mornings were a great time to relax and prepare for the day. During a couple of the days L had some alternative medicine treatments while I op shopped to my heart’s content. When I was finished I found two great coffee shops in the trendy part of town. One vegan type one was so popular that police teams came in for their lunch. The other was a Coffee Club which had a distinct Queenslander feel to it. It had a huge outdoor room on the pavement and I commended them on their Disabled Toilet being Ostomy friendly.

On the last day we popped over to Indooroopilly Shopping Centre for a bit of shopping and lunch in the food hall. While we were there I received an urgent voicemail from the manager of dad’s care home. She said that my estranged brother was saying that he was in charge of dad and he wanted all his ID and paperwork so that he could move him to near where he now lives. She had managed to stop him but was very concerned. I told her I would be back the next day and the rest of the afternoon, my last day with L was spent making phone calls to see what could be done to stop this happening.

The next morning L dropped me at the airport and I made my way home. Waiting at Newcastle Airport for me was my lover, my friend, my companion and my partner. All four rolled into one. We had a glorious drive back, after watching the Airforce aircraft taking off just over our heads at Williamstown.

I Cannot Let Myself Go Down That Path

Today my story is featured on ABC News Radio and News Online which both go national across Australia. This is my second time being interviewed by Giselle Watakama and she really makes it easy. She also has a magic way of pulling the secret stuff out of me. The stuff I try to cover up from the public, the people I know and often from my loved ones. She even manages to capture the quaver in my voice, because dammit I cannot hide that. Would if I could, truly.

I do not want my son or my lover to see me panting as my body tries to fill my ostomy bag. Panting as if I am birthing a hippopotamus. Because that is what it feels like. Pure agony for at least thirty minutes, often two hours  and exhaustion afterwards. And then there is the small matter of getting a bag to fit on my ostomy now. The mesh has sucked an area a bit like an inverted teacup beside my stoma. Right where the mesh is. And it is next to impossible to get a seal. So out of the myriad modern devices designed to make life easier for the modern ostomy I am left with an older version which does not seal and also the filter does not function well. Requiring me to ask friends if I stink. Because these days all I smell is poo.

Things are not all bad. As everyone knows I do not like to give in. And I am very stubborn and determined. And I like to advocate to help others who are injured and to try to stop others from becoming injured. While in hospital last week I met a really impressive Colo Rectal surgeon, Dr Peter Pockney who also teaches surgery at Newcastle University. And he is a member of my surgeon, Dr Brian Draganic’s team Newcastle Colorectal. I was impressed with his intelligent way of communicating. Dr Draganic also is very down to earth. I am hoping at some stage to talk to them about starting a mesh clinic up here at John Hunter Hospital. Or a Hernia Mesh Clinic as RPA has the Pelvic one. These two surgeons did not place my mesh. Presently I have started a support group on Facebook for Hernia Mesh injured. It is called Australian Hernia Mesh Support Group. We are gaining more members due to the radio interview on ABC today which is wonderful. People who do not usually use Facebook so I have given then my name and mailing address instead.

Some of the timeline of the article was a little bit out. So much for Giselle to sort through. Basically I had the mesh inserted in 2015, three years after my ostomy was formed. The photo above was taken after I got home from the mesh repair. Not knowing then I had a mesh infection, which is NOT considered to be a good thing in mesh circles.

So for most of early 2015 I was in and out of John Hunter with bowel obstructions. I was given emergency surgery in August 2015 for a Parastomal Hernia  and mesh was inserted. I have been much worse since, though not to the point of vomiting faeces but that is because I am so vigilant to not let the obstructions get to that point. But she is right. I do fear choking on faeces, because I did, for many many hours and even The NG  tube could not suck it all away. It was the only time in my life I wanted to run away and die somewhere where nobody could find me. Well I did once after I started looking after my demented parents in 2013 but I had just left my nasty husband and walked into the hell of Alzheimer’s. With a new stoma and a then undiagnosed Hernia.

So basically Giselle let me talk, and tried to make sense of what I said, with no medical training and my tendency to ramble she did a great job! What was even better for us Mesh campaigners and advocates was the info she came up with. We need these skills!  Basically the College of Surgeons are concerned about this Hernia mesh issue. It is so good to know that.

‘Anyway the article is here. I will leave you to read it, to absorb it, and to try to know that my life might sound awful but I do see the bigger picture. In my case I do not have Alzheimer’s. Whew. And I can still laugh at myself. My son is wonderful,  as are my friends. And I have a magical lover/partner who does not notice my bag, thinks I am brave and encourages me to not see myself as disabled. It is only when I try to walk that I feel disabled, and it is only brief. Cause I cannot let myself go down that path.

Finally I would like to thank the lovely Rosie and Marion of John Hunter’s new Acute Surgical Ward. Talk about wonderful nurses. Beyond wonderful. And then there was the delightful Rory, the resident from Belfast. And the canular technician called in who finally got a vein. Am covered in bruises. Little love bites to remind me of my stay.

Common Circus Belmont

Yesterday I had a flu shot administered by a medical student under the expert instructions of my GP. We all survived, I still have my arm, though it is a tad sore at the site which is usual.

The student was male which was unusual as we get a lot of female med students and he did an excellent job for a first injection!

I felt in need of a coffee as I always do if I am in the vicinity of Common Circus, the wonderful homewares and coffee shop opposite Belmont Lake.

I have been coming here since I moved into my home in 2015 and really love sitting at the large communal monk’s style table. I blog my memoirs, surreptitiously people and baby watch and chat to people from all walks of life as well as these days assess who is a tourist.

I remember the first time in 2016 when I was asked if I was a local! By a tourist. It was incredible and I felt really proud of my beautiful region. Then I chatted about Words With Friends and other things and yesterday I observed a lovely interaction with some young mums at the table.

One mum had a newborn in a sling which the other mum nursed for her. Her little toddler was hidden by the plants in the middle of the table so I could not see what he was doing. He was very quiet.

I asked if it was okay to take photos for my blog. Assured them it was anonymous and covered women’s health etc and coffee shop reviews! They liked that I think though the gorgeous young mum was concerned she looked awful as was sleep deprived and had no make up on.

You can judge for yourself from the photos below. There were lots of people coming and going. Business types in suits getting their take away coffees. Older people reading newspapers while they savoured theirs. And then the younger ones perched on the stools looking towards the lake.

There is a lovely outdoor area with a communal table and the staff is always perky. And not as a result of the coffee. They are naturally inclined that way! And. They know the names of most of their regulars!

I highly recommend this place, not least for the service they provide but for the way they make use of recycled paper boxes and napkins and cups instead of plates and cups and saucers. Their coffee and food is unparalleled too.

The decor is gorgeous with patchwork panelling and colourful coffee machines. Currently pink. Used to be aqua. I prefer the aqua but that is just my taste and the pink does not nauseate me as it may some people I know. Think fifties kitchens. Pretty.

Five star review. Excellent and has remained so, even improved if that is possible.